New Release – “Notes on Ukrainian Demonology”

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Notes on Ukrainian Demonology book cover with a devil in forest

Notes on Ukrainian Demonology is an ideal introduction into the mysterious and terrifying world of Ukrainian ancient beliefs about otherworldly creatures. The book consists of four chapters. Each chapter focuses on a specific Ukrainian demonology character. These are: “Mertsi” (cf. walking or living dead), Rusalky(cf. water nymphs or sirens), “Chorty” (cf. devils) and “Witches”. However, the stories are quite extensive and touch upon other supernatural beings.

Originally, the four chapters in the books were separate articles. The author, folklorist, and ethnographer, Vasyl Myloradovych, published them in 1891 and 1901. The next time the articles saw the world again was in 1993. Our publication is the first English translation of Myloradovych’s research. 

Probably, the most fascinating aspect of this book is the comparison, which Myloradovych drew among numerous cultures and their demonological believes. Thus, the book mentions Italy, France, England, Spain, Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and the cultures of other countries. For example, the author compared:

  • What ingredients witches of different cultures use in their ointment in order to fly.
  • How various nations protect themselves against the living dead. 
  • Distinctive features of Ukrainian rusalky and classic Greek sirens. 

Also, Myloradovych mentions, the most popular places in several countries, which are popular among the witches for their Sabbaths. These are: Puy de Dome (in France), Baraona (in Spain), the Brocken (in Northern Germany), and Lysa Hora (in Ukraine). 

We hope you enjoy reading Notes on Ukrainian Demonology as much as we enjoyed working on it. 🙂

Just a little reminder, this book is part of our Ukrainian Scholar Library Series. Check it out, you might find interesting a book on Ukrainian ancient spells or ritual Easter eggs, pysanky.